They All With One Accord

They All With One Accord                                          April 14, 2024

Have you ever been in a worship service and all of a sudden, you’re thinking about a Honda Accord?  Perhaps you’ve experienced this brain tease, when a verse is read from the book of Acts about the Christians being gathered together in “one accord.”  One accord?  What does that mean?

The expression “one accord” is used 11 times in the book of Acts.  It comes from a compound Greek word that combines the words for “same” and “mind,” to literally mean “the same mind.”  The word is used to emphasize the “unanimity” of the early church.  They were not all sitting together in one Honda Accord, but they were so unanimous in their devotion to the Lord that maybe they could have figured out a way to fit.

Let’s consider the usage of this word in the book of Acts.  First, note that the early Christians were not the only ones who acted in unanimity.  The enemies of Christ themselves acted “with one accord.”  Those who heard Stephen preach “cried out with a loud voice, stopped their ears, and ran at him with one accord…and stoned him” (Acts 7:57-58).  The same occurred when the Jews in Corinth “with one accord rose up against Paul” (18:12), and when the Ephesian mob “rushed into the theater with one accord, having seized Gaius and Aristarchus, Macedonians, Paul’s travel companions” (19:29).  In each of these instances, the people were of “the same mind” and “same purpose” and “unanimous” in their actions.

When the enemies of Christ ally together in attacks against Christians, guess what Christians need to do?  They also need (and will) ally together, with the same mind, to stand against such attacks, defend the gospel and further the cause of Christ together.  Take note of some other times in Acts when Luke employed this expression.

The early Christians “with one accord” came together “in prayer and supplication” (1:14) and “raised their voice to God” (4:24).  How often today do we come together “with one accord” for the purpose of praying to God?

The early Christians “with one accord” came together to enjoy fellowship and food with one another (2:46).  How often today do we take the initiative to get a group of Christians together “with one accord” just to be with each other and enjoy each other’s company?

The early Christians “with one accord” came together in one place to “speak” God’s word (5:12; cf. 8:6) and to send chosen men out with a message to the churches (15:25).

God still wants His church to assemble and behave “with one accord.”  So, are you “in” the accord or not?

David Sproule, Palm Beach Lakes, Florida

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